CHARLES G. FINNEY

Complete INDEX of Individual

SERMONS And LECTURES

by Charles G. Finney

 Individual Sermon or Lecture Title is in Blue

Volume Title is in Red

In the Order of their Original Publication

 

Can Two Walk Together Except They Be Agreed?

Sermons on Various Subjects

SINNERS BOUND TO CHANGE THEIR OWN HEART.

HOW TO CHANGE YOUR HEART

TRADITIONS OF THE ELDERS

 

Lectures on Revivals of Religion

PREFACE TO 1835 AND 1868 EDITIONS BY THE LECTURER. 

LECTURE I. - WHAT A REVIVAL OF RELIGION IS. What a revival of religion is not - What it is - The agencies employed in promoting it.

LECTURE II. - WHEN A REVIVAL IS TO BE EXPECTED. When a revival is needed - The importance of a revival when it is needed - When a revival of religion may be expected.

LECTURE III. - HOW TO PROMOTE A REVIVAL. What it is to break up the fallow ground - How it is to be performed.

LECTURE IV. - PREVAILING PRAYER. What is effectual or prevailing prayer - Some of the most essential attributes of prevailing prayer - Some reasons why God requires this kind of prayer - That such prayer will avail much.

LECTURE V. - THE PRAYER OF FAITH. Faith an indispensable condition of prevailing prayer - What it is we are to believe when we pray - When we are bound to exercise this faith - This kind of faith in prayer always obtains the blessing sought - How we are to come into the state of mind in which we can exercise such faith - Objections answered.

LECTURE VI. - THE SPIRIT OF PRAYER. What Spirit is spoken of in the passage: "The Spirit also helpeth our infirmities" - What that Spirit does for us - Why He does what the text declares Him to do - How He accomplishes it - The degrees of His influences - How His influences are to be distinguished from the influences of evil spirits - Who have a right to expect His influences.

LECTURE VII. - ON BEING FILLED WITH THE SPIRIT. Individuals may have the Spirit of God - It is their duty to be filled with the Spirit - Why the Spirit is not obtained - The guilt of those who have not the Spirit of God - The consequences of having the Spirit. - The consequences that will follow not having the Spirit.

LECTURE VIII. - MEETINGS FOR PRAYER. The design of prayer meetings - The manner of conducting them - Several things that will defeat the design of holding them.

LECTURE IX. - MEANS TO BE USED WITH SINNERS. On what particular points Christians are to testify for God - The manner in which they are to testify.

LECTURE X. - TO WIN SOULS REQUIRES WISDOM.How Christians should deal with careless sinners - How they should deal with awakened sinners, and with convicted sinners.

LECTURE XI. - A WISE MINISTER WILL BE SUCCESSFUL A right discharge of the duties of a minister requires great wisdom - The amount of success in the discharge of his duties (other things being equal) decides the amount of wisdom employed by him.

LECTURE XII. - HOW TO PREACH THE GOSPEL. Several passages of Scripture ascribe conversion to man - This is consistent with other passages which ascribe conversion to God - Several important particulars in regard to preaching the Gospel.

LECTURE XIII. - HOW CHURCHES CAN HELP MINISTERS. The importance of the cooperation of the Church in producing and carrying on a revival - Several things which Churches must do, if they would promote a revival and aid their ministers.

LECTURE XIV. - MEASURES TO PROMOTE REVIVALS. God has established no particular system of measures to be employed - Our present forms of public worship have been arrived at by a succession of new measures.

LECTURE XV. - HINDRANCES TO REVIVALS. A revival of religion is a great work - Several things which may put a stop to it - What must be done for the continuance of a revival.

LECTURE XVI. - THE NECESSITY AND EFFECT OF UNION. We are to be agreed in prayer - We are likewise to be agreed in everything that is essential to the blessing we seek.

LECTURE XVII. - FALSE COMFORTS FOR SINNERS. The necessity and design of instructing anxious sinners - Anxious sinners are always seeking comfort - The false comforts that are often administered.

LECTURE XVIII. - DIRECTIONS TO SINNERS. What is a proper direction to be given to sinners when they make inquiry for salvation - What is a proper answer to such inquiry - Several errors into which anxious sinners are apt to fall.

LECTURE XIX. - INSTRUCTIONS TO CONVERTS. Several things to be considered in regard to the hopes of young converts - Several things respecting their making a profession of religion - The importance of having correct instruction given to young converts - What should not be taught - What things are necessary to be taught.

LECTURE XX. - INSTRUCTIONS TO CONVERTS (continued). Other points on which young converts ought to be instructed - How young converts should be treated by the Church - Some of the evils resulting from defective instruction in the first stages of Christian experience.

LECTURE XXI. - THE BACKSLIDER IN HEART. What backsliding in heart is not - What it is - What are its evidences - What are its consequences - How to recover from such a state.

LECTURE XXII. - GROWTH IN GRACE. What grace is - What the injunction to "grow in grace" does not mean - What it does mean - Conditions of growth in grace - What is not proof of growth - What is proof - How to grow in grace.

 

Sermons on Important Subjects

Sinners Bound To Change Their Own Hearts

How To Change Your Heart

Traditions Of The Elders

Total Depravity

Total Depravity 2

Why Sinners Hate God

God Cannot Please Sinners

Christian Affinity

Stewardship

Doctrine of Election

Reprobation

Love Of The World

Lectures to Professing Christians 1836-37

1836 LECTURES
Self Deceivers

False Professors

Doubtful Actions Are Sinful

Reproof A Christian Duty

True Saints

Legal Religion

Religion of Public Opinion

Conformity To The World

True And False Repentance

Dishonesty In Small Matters Inconsistent With Honesty In Any Thing

Bound To Know Your True Character

1837 LECTURES

True And False Conversion

True Submission

Selfishness Not True Religion

Religion Of The Law And Gospel

Justification By Faith

Sanctification By Faith

Legal Experience

Christian Perfection Pt 1

Christian Perfection Pt 2

Way Of Salvation

Necessity Of Divine Teaching

Love The Whole Of Religion

Rest Of The Saints

Christ The Husband Of The Church

 

The Oberlin Evangelist 1839-1862

1839

Eternal Life

Faith

Devotion

True and False Religion

The Law of God--no. 1

The Law of God--no. 2

Glorifying God

True and False Peace

Gospel Freedom

Carefulness a Sin

The Promises of God--no. 1

The Promises of God--no. 2

(cont.) The Promises of God--no. 3

(cont.) The Promises of God--no. 4

(cont.) The Promises of God--no. 5

Being in Debt

The Holy Spirit of Promise

The Covenants

The Rest of Faith--no. 1

The Rest of Faith--no. 2

The Affections and Emotions of God

Legal and Gospel Experience

How to Prevent Our Employments From Injuring Our Souls

Grieving the Holy Spirit--no. 1

Grieving the Holy Spirit--no. 2

 
LETTERS AND ARTICLES
To The Young Christians Who Have Been Converted In The Great Revivals # 1

To The Christian Readers of The Oberlin Evangelist

To The Young Christians Who Have Been Converted In The Great Revivals # 2

To The Readers: Four Classes of Professors In The Church

Why The Converts of The Great Revivals Have Not Grown More In Grace # 1

Why The Converts of The Great Revivals Have Not Grown More In Grace # 2

1840

Sanctification--no. 1

Sanctification--no. 2

Sanctification--no. 3

Sanctification--no. 4

Sanctification--no. 5

Sanctification--no. 6

Sanctification--no. 7

Sanctification--no. 8

Sanctification--no. 9

Unbelief--no. 1

Unbelief--no. 2

Blessednesss of Benevolence

A Willing Mind Indispensable to a Right Understanding of Truth

Death to Sin

The Gospel the Savor of Life or of Death

Christians the Light of the World

Communion with God--no. 1

Communion with God--no. 2

Temptations Must Be Put Away

Design or Intention Constitutes Character

Confession of Faults

Weakness of Heart

A Single and an Evil Eye

Salvation Always Conditional

Letters and Articles

TO THE EDITORS OF PERIODICALS WHO ARE PROFESSING CHRISTIANS.

TO THE PROFESSORS OF RELIGION WHO WERE MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH PREVIOUS TO THE LATE GREAT REVIVALS

Nine Letters to Ministers

Seven Letters To Parents 

Advertisement for Publication of "Skeletons of a Course of Theological Lectures by Rev. C.G. Finney"

Four Letters to Believers in The Doctrine of Entire and Continued Sanctification in This Life

1841

Submission to God

Submission to God--no. 2

Love Worketh No Ill

Self Denial

The True Service of God

Entire Consecration a Condition of Discipleship

A Seared Conscience

A Seared Conscience--no. 2

Conditions of Being Kept

National Fast Day

Mediatorship of Christ

Letters and Articles

11 Letters by Charles Finney in Response to Objections Made to His "LETTERS TO BELIEVERS IN THE DOCTRINE OF ENTIRE AND CONTINUED SANCTIFICATION IN THIS LIFE IN 4 LETTERS" published in the 1840 Oberlin Evangelist

3 Additional Articles to the Oberlin Evangelist: First, Second, Third

1842

Thy Will Be Done

Danger of Delusion

Ability and Inability

God Under Obligation To Do Right

Ordination Sermon

Wisdom Justified of Her Children

1843

Prove All Things

Nature of True Virtue

Selfishness

Christian Character

Christian Warfare

Putting on Christ

Way to Be Holy

What Attainments Christians May Reasonably Expect to Make in This Life

Necessity and Nature of Divine Teaching

Fulness There is in Christ

Justification

Unbelief

Gospel Liberty

Joy in God

The Benevolence of God

Revelation of God's Glory

1844

Hardness of Heart

The Eyes Opened to the Law of God

The Eyes Opened to the Law of God pt.--2

Christian Witnesses for God

Fearing the Lord and Walking in Darkness

Blessed are the Poor in Spirit

1845

The Sin of Fretfulness

Governing the Tongue

Dependence on Christ

Weights and Besetting Sins

Rejoicing in Boastings

The Church Bound to Convert the World

The Church Bound to Convert the World pt.--2

Trusting in God's Mercy

The Old Man and The New

Coming Up through Great Tribulation

Delighting in the Lord

Having a Good Conscience

Relations of Christ to the Believer

The Folly of Refusing to be Saved

Seeking the Kingdom of God First

Faith in its Relations to the Love of God

Victory over the World through Faith

Letters and Articles

21 Letters On Revival: 1845

4 LETTERS FROM PROF. FINNEY TO MISS A.E. OF VERMONT

EXPLANATORY REMARKS FROM PROF. FINNEY UPON A RECENT SERMON

1846

The Nature of Impenitence and the Measure of Its Guilt

The Rule by Which the Guilt of Sin is Estimated

On Divine Manifestations

On the Lord's Supper

Forfeiting Birth-right Blessings

Afflictions of the Righteous and the Wicked Contrasted

On Becoming Acquainted With God

God Manifesting Himself to Moses

Coming to The Waters of Life

The Blessedness of Enduring Temptation

Quenching the Spirit

Responsibility of Hearing the Gospel

Letters and Articles

11 Letters On Revival

Letters to Christians #1

1847

All Things for Good to Those that Love God

All Events Ruinous to the Sinner

Heart Condemnation, A Proof that God Also Condemns

An Approving Heart--Confidence in Prayer

Conditions of Prevailing Prayer

Conditions of Prevailing Prayer pt.--2

Conditions of Prevailing Prayer pt.--3

Letters and Articles  

Prof. Finney's letters to Christians #2

Prof. Finney's letters to Christians #3

Prof. Finney's View on Justification by Faith

1848

Refuges of Lies

The Spirit Not Striving Always

The Excuses of Sinners Condemn God

Conditions of Being Saved

Substitution

Pride of Heart Deceives

Letters and Articles  

Last Sickness and Death of Mrs. Finney

Difficulties with the Doctrine of Sanctification Stated and Removed

1849

Mutual Confession of Faults, and Mutual Prayer

God's Anger Against the Wicked

Evil Thinking

Prayer for A Pure Heart

The Joy of God's Salvation

Jesus, A Savior from Sinning

The Self-Hardening Sinner's Doom

The Death of Saints Precious

God Not Pleased with the Death of the Wicked

The Spirit of Christ, and the Spirit of True Christianity

Judicial Blindness

The Peace of God Ruling in the Christian's Heart

Receiving Honor from Men and Not from God

Faith the Work of God

1850

The Foundation, Conditions, and Relations of Faith

Letters and Articles

Finney's Reception and Published Works in England

Early Life of C.G. Finney

Long Report on Finney by the "British Banner"

Finney's Labors Described

Prof. Finney in London

Prof. Finney's Labors in London

Prof. Finney's Orthodoxy in England

"British Banner" Reports on Finney

British Estimate of Finney's Usefulness

Note on When Finney will Return from England

Newspapeer Reporter on Finney's Labors in England

Late Notice of Finney Preaching in England

1851

The Loss When a Soul is Lost

Awaking from The Sleep of Spiritual Death

Jesus Christ Doing Good

The Wicked Heart Set to do Evil

Repentance Before Prayer for Forgiveness

Letters and Articles

Report of Finney's Labors in London

Finney's Letter to Massachusetts Critics of Revivals

Closing Account of Finney's Labors in England

Remarks on Revivals of 1830, 1831

Address by Finney to Graduating Class

1852

The Child-Like Spirit an Essential Condition of Entering Heaven

The Fearful Results of a Spiritual Relapse

God's Love to Sinners as Seen in the Gospel

All Things for Good to Those That Love God

All Things Conspire for Evil to The Sinner

Guilt Modified by Ignorance

Salvation Difficult to The Christian--Impossible to The Sinner

The Salvation of Sinners Impossible

Paul and Felix, Or Preaching and Procrastination

Christ Tempted, Suffering, and Able to Succor The Tempted

Election and Reprobation

Letters and Articles

Report on Revival of Finney in Hartford, Conn

Remarks on Hartford, Conn. Revival

1853

Prayer and Labor for the Gathering of The Great Harvest

Men Invited to Reason Together With God

The Saviour Lifted up, and the Look of Faith

The Sinner's Excuses Answered

God's Love for A Sinning World

Alive Without the Law, Slain Thereby

The Essential Elements of Christian Experience

Death to Sin Through Christ

The Richman and Lazarus

Losing One's First Love

Jehovah's Appeal to Sinners and Backsliders

Letters and Articles

Pres. Finney in Syracuse, NY

On Sanctification by Finney--#1

Report on Finney in Syracuse

On Sanctificaton by Finney--#2

Shall the Holy Ghost be recognized in Revivals?

Remarks on Finney in Syracuse

On Sanctificaton by Finney--#3

To the NY Synod by Finney

1854

Converting Sinners A Christian Duty

Christ Our Advocate with The Father

The Inner and The Outer Revelation

On Quenching The Spirit

What Men Highly Esteem, God Abhors

Variety in the Service Offered to God

License, Bondage and Liberty

Living by Faith

God's Commandments Not Grievous

The Wages of Sin

The Wants of Man and Their Supply

Where Sin Occurs God Cannot Wisely Prevent It

The Ways of Sin Hard; Of Holiness, Pleasant

The Indications and The Guilt of Backsliding

The Christian's Genuine Hope

The Primitive Prayer-Meeting

Letters and Articles

Finney Preaches Revival in Cincinnati

Report of Revival in Cincinnati

1855

On Prayer

On Persevering Prayer for Others

On Being Almost Persuaded to be a Christian

On Neglecting Salvation

On Prayer for The Holy Spirit

Conscience and The Bible in Harmony

God Has No Pleasure In The Sinner's Death

On Being Searched of God

On Injustice To Character

God's Goodness Toward Men Basely Requited

Losing First Love

Men, Ignorant of God's Righteousness, Would Fain Establish Their Own

Adorning the Doctrine of God Our Savior

Letters and Articles

Welsh Paper's account of Revival in Rome, NY

Finney preaches Revival For Cowles in Rome, NY

Finney to The Readers of The Oberlin Evangelist

1856

Thanks for The Gospel Victory

Gospel Ministers Ambassadors for Christ

The Destruction of the Wicked

The Wicked Stumbling in Their Darkness

On The Atonement

The Sinner's Natural Power and Moral Weakness

Moral Insanity

On Believing with The Heart

On Offering Praise to God

Letters and Articles

Finney Preaching Revival in Rochester

Eyewitness Report by Cowles on Rochester Revival

Revival in Rochester

Report on Rochester Revival

Finney Departs Rochester

1857

Owing God pt1

Owing God pt2

On Sinning  

On Being Holy

The Lord's People His Portion

The Wrath of God Against Those Who Withstand His Truth

On Confessing and Being Cleansed From Sin

Letters and Articles

Finney Winters in Boston

Pres. Finney, Boston and Oberlin

1858

The Doom of Those Who Neglect The Great Salvation

The Treasure and The Pearl

The Self-Righteous Sinner Doomed to Sorrow

Sufficient Grace

On Following Christ

Christian Consciousness, A Witness for God

God's Love To Us

The Blessedness of the Merciful

Blessedness of The Pure In Heart

Blessed Are The Persecuted

On Refuges Of Lies

God's Wrath Against Those Who Withstand His Truth

Abiding In Christ and Not Sinning

1859

On Tenderness of Heart

The One Thing Needful

On Self-Denial

The Way That Seems Right, But Ends In Death

Letters and Articles

Dr. Campbell on Pres. Finney in England

Dr. Campbell and Pres. Finney.

Dr. Redford on Prest. Finney's Theology.

Mr. Finney in Scotland

1860

On Loving God

On Love To Our Neighbor

Spiritual Delusion

On Leaving One's First Love

Letters and Articles

President Finney and His Labors.

Finney in Bolton, England

Bolton Chronicle Report of Revival in England

The Revival in Bolton

Finney's Labors in Bolton, England

Report of Revival in England

Finney Returns from England

A Call To Finney to Write His Revival "Memoirs"

1861

Christ's Yoke Is Easy

Christ Our Advocate

Living To Please God

Wherefore Do The Wicked Live

Hardness Of Heart

Harden Not Your Heart

Tender-Heartedness

The Kingdom of God In Consciousness

Looking To Jesus

Profit and Loss; Or The Worth of The Soul pt. 1

Profit and Loss; Or The Worth of The Soul pt. 2

Sinners Not Willing To Be Christians pt. 1

Sinners Not Willing To Be Christians pt. 2

Holding The Truth in Unrighteousness pt. 1

Holding The Truth in Unrighteousness pt. 2

Any One Form of Sin Persisted In Is Fatal To The Soul

Revival pt 1

Revival pt 2

Revival pt 3

Letters and Articles

Report on Finney's Health

1862

Great Peace pt 1

Great Peace pt 2

Moral Depravity pt 1

Moral Depravity pt 2

 

Views Of Sanctification 1840

 

Skeletons of a Course of Theological Lectures 1840

PREFACE Methods to be used in this course of study. What to expect and what not to expect. What is required.

LECTURE 1. Introduction. Define the Study; Requisite Personal Qualifications; Advantages derived from the study of Systematic Theology; Things to be avoided.

LECTURE 2. Some things implied in the study of Theology; Some things that we know of man, independently of any revelation or knowledge of God.

LECTURE 3. Importance of a correct knowledge of the laws of evidence; Evidence and Proof, and their difference; Sources of evidence; Kinds and degrees of evidence; When objections are not, and when they are fatal; How objections are to be disposed of; On whom lies the burden of proof; Where proof or argument must begin.

LECTURE 4. Existence of God. Methods of proof; Their amount.

LECTURE 5. Atheism. Definition; Different forms; Principal objections to Theism answered; Difficulties of Atheism.

LECTURE 6. Divine authority of the Bible. A farther revelation from God than that which is made in the works or nature and providence needed; Such a revelation possible; Such a revelation probable; The scriptures of the Old and New Testaments, a direct revelation from God.

LECTURE 7. Inspiration of the Bible. What is not implied in the inspiration of the Bible; What is implied; How a question of this kind cannot be proved; How it can be proved; The Bible an inspired Book; Objections answered.

LECTURE 8. Deism. Deism defined; Different classes of Deists; Their objections to Christianity; Difficulties of Deism.

LECTURE 9. Natural Attributes of God. A Natural Attribute defined; What are some of the Natural Attributes of God; Prove that God possesses them.

LECTURE 10. Moral Attributes of God. A Moral Attribute defined; Some of the Moral Attributes of God; Prove that God possesses them; Benevolence.

LECTURE 11. Justice of God. The term Justice defined; The several senses in which it is used; God is just; An objection answered.

LECTURE 12. Mercy of God. What Mercy is not; What it is; In what cases it can be exercised; To what extent; On what conditions; Mercy an attribute of God.

LECTURE 13. Truth of God. Truth defined; Truth an attribute of God.

LECTURE 14. Wisdom of God. Wisdom defined; Wisdom an attribute of God.

LECTURE 15. Holiness of God. Remarks; Holiness defined; Holiness an attribute of God.

LECTURE 16. Unity of God. Meaning of the term Unity when applied to God; Remarks in respect to the manner in which this subject has been treated in different ages and nations; Unity of God proved.

LECTURE 17. Trinity or Tri unity of God. Doctrine stated; The point now under consideration; Sources of evidence; Amount of evidence to be expected, if the doctrine be true; Proof adduced; Objections answered.

LECTURE 18. Divinity of Christ. What is intended by the Divinity of Christ; Christ truly divine, or the true God; Objections answered.

LECTURE 19. Humanity of Christ. Various opinions noticed; What is intended by the Humanity of Christ; Doctrine proved.

LECTURE 20. Personality and Divinity of the Holy Spirit. What is not intended by the Divinity of the Holy Spirit; He is truly God; What is intended by the Personality of the Holy Spirit; His Divinity proved.

LECTURE 21. Providence of God. What is intended by the Providence of God; God administers over the universe a providential government; Different theories and arguments noticed; Show what seems to be the truth.

LECTURE 22. Moral Government. Moral Government defined; What it implies.

LECTURE 23. Foundation of Moral Obligation. Moral Obligation defined; Conditions of Moral Obligation; Foundation of Moral Obligation.

LECTURE 24. Whose right it is to govern. God a moral being; God a Moral Governor.

LECTURE 25. What is implied in the right to Govern. Reciprocal duties of rulers and ruled.

LECTURE 26. Moral Law. What Law is; Moral Law defined; Moral Law a unit; No being can make law; The will of the ruler can be obligatory only as it is declaratory of what the Law is.

LECTURE 27. Law of God. What is intended by the Law of God; The Commandments declaratory; The Ten Commandments illustrations of this; Sanctions of the Law; First Commandment. Its true meaning. Second Commandment. Reasons for it; what it prohibits. Third Commandment. Its true spirit; Reasons for this Commandment.

LECTURE 28. Fourth Commandment. When the Sabbath was instituted; Its design; Its necessity; Its perpetual and universal obligation; The manner of its observance; Its change from the seventh to the first day of the week.

LECTURE 29. Fifth Commandment. Reasons for this Commandment; What it implies; What it prohibits. Sixth Commandment. What its letter prohibits; Its true spirit; What is, and what is not prohibited by its spirit; What its spirit requires; Reasons for it; Violations of it.

LECTURE 30. Seventh Commandment. What it implies; What it prohibits; Reasons for it. Eighth Commandment. What it implies; What it prohibits; Reasons for it; When it is violated.

LECTURE 31. Ninth Commandment. What it implies; What is not a violation of it; What it prohibits; Reasons for it. Tenth Commandment. What it implies; What is not a breach of it; What it prohibits and enjoys; Reasons for it.

LECTURE 32. Sanctions of Law. What constitutes sanctions; There can be no Law without them; In what light they are to be regarded; The end to be secured by law and the execution of penal Sanctions; Rule for graduating them.

LECTURE 33. Sanctions of God's Law. God's law has Sanctions; What constitutes the remuneratory Sanctions of God's Law; Their perfection and duration; What constitutes its vindicatory Sanctions; Their duration.

LECTURE 34. Governmental principles.

LECTURE 35. The Atonement. Its Intention; The Atonement necessary.

LECTURE 36. Reasons why an Atonement was preferable to punishment, or to the execution of the Divine Law.

LECTURE 37. What constitutes the Atonement. Not Christ's obedience to law as a covenant of works; His sufferings and death constitute the Atonement; His taking human nature and obeying unto death a reason for our being treated as righteous: Nature and kind of his sufferings; Amount of his sufferings; The Atonement not a commercial transaction; The Atonement a satisfaction of public justice.

LECTURE 38. Value of the Atonement. In what its value consists; How great its value is; For whose benefit it was intended.

LECTURE 39. Influence of the Atonement.

LECTURE 40. Objections answered.

LECTURE 41. Human Governments a part of the Moral Government of God. Human Governments a necessity of human nature; This necessity will continue as long as men exist in the present world; Human Governments recognized in the Bible as a part of the Government of God; Whose right and duty it is to govern; In what cases human legislation imposes moral obligation, It is the duty of all men to aid in the establishment and support of Human Government; The supposition that Human Government can ever be dispensed with in this world, a ridiculous and absurd dream; Objections answered.

LECTURE 42. Human Governments a part of the Moral Government of God. Reasons why God has made no particular form of Church or State Governments universally obligatory; Particular forms of Church and State Government must and will depend upon the intelligence and virtue of the people: True basis on which the right of Human Legislation rests; That form of Government is obligatory, that is best suited to meet the necessities of the people; Revolutions become necessary and obligatory, when the virtue and intelligence, or the vice and ignorance of the people demand them; In what cases Human Legislation is valid, and in what cases it is null and void; In what cases we are bound to disobey Human Governments.

 

Letters To Parents --1840

LETTER #1

LETTER #2

LETTER #3

LETTER #4

LETTER #5

LETTER #6

LETTER #7

 

Holiness of Christians in this Present Life--1843

PROVE ALL THINGS

NATURE OF TRUE VIRTUE

SELFISHNESS

CHRISTIAN CHARACTER

CHRISTIAN WARFARE

PUTTING ON CHRIST

WAY TO BE HOLY

WHAT ATTAINMENTS CHRISTIANS MAY REASONABLY EXPECT TO MAKE IN THIS LIFE.

NECESSITY AND NATURE OF DIVINE TEACHING.

FULNESS THERE IS IN CHRIST

JUSTIFICATION

UNBELIEF

GOSPEL LIBERTY

 

Letters On Revival--1845-46

LETTER NO. 1

LETTER NO. 2

LETTER NO. 3

LETTER NO. 4

LETTER NO. 5

LETTER NO. 6

LETTER NO. 7

LETTER NO. 8

LETTER NO. 9

LETTER NO. 10

LETTER NO 11

LETTER NO. 12

LETTER NO. 13

LETTER NO. 14

LETTER NO. 15

LETTER NO. 16

LETTER NO. 17

LETTER NO. 18

LETTER NO. 19

LETTER NO. 20

LETTER NO. 21

LETTER NO. 22

LETTER NO. 23

LETTER NO. 24

LETTER NO. 25

LETTER NO. 26

LETTER NO. 27

LETTER NO. 28

LETTER NO. 29

LETTER NO. 30

LETTER NO. 31

LETTER NO. 32

 

Systematic Theology, Volume 2 --1846

TITLE PAGE

PREFACE

LECTURE 1

Moral government

Definition of the term Law -- Distinction between Physical and Moral Law -- The essential Attributes of Moral Law -- Liberty as opposed to Necessity -- Adaptability, or Adaptation -- Universality -- Uniformity -- Impartiality -- Justice -- Practicability -- Independence -- Immutability -- Unity -- Equity -- Expediency -- Exclusiveness -- Utility

LECTURE 2

Moral Government--Continued

Definition of the term Government -- Distinction between moral and physical government -- The fundamental reason of Moral Government -- Whose right it is to govern -- What is implied in the right to govern -- Point out the limits of this right -- What is implied in Moral Government -- Definition of Moral Obligation -- The conditions of Moral Obligation -- Remarks

LECTURE 3

Moral Government--Continued

Man a subject of Moral Obligation -- Extent of Moral Obligation -- Shown by an appeal to reason, or to natural theology, to what acts and states of mind moral obligation cannot directly extend -- Shown to what acts and states of mind Moral Obligation must directly extend -- To what acts and mental states Moral Obligation indirectly extends

LECTURE 4

Foundation of Moral Obligation

Definition of Moral Obligation repeated -- Attention called again to the conditions of Moral Obligation -- What is intended by the foundation of moral obligation -- The extent of moral obligation -- Points of agreement among the principal parties in this discussion --Wherein parties differ -- Shown from reason and revelation what must be the foundation of moral obligation -- Shown wherein that consists which constitutes the true foundation of moral obligation; in other words, in what the highest well-being or ultimate good of sentient beings consists -- The ultimate and absolute good must belong to being, or to sentient existences -- With moral agents at least the ultimate good must consist in a state of mind -- The ultimate and absolute good in the sense of the intrinsically valuable, cannot be identical with Moral Law --Obedience, or the course of acting or willing required by the law, cannot be the ultimate end aimed at by the law or the lawgiver -- The absolute and ultimate good of being cannot consist in moral worth or good desert -- Right Character, moral worth, good desert, meritoriousness, or whatever you call it, cannot be or consist in a state of mind -- The ultimate or absolute good cannot consist in anything external to mind itself -- Objections to this philosophy considered

LECTURE 5

Foundation of Moral Obligation--False Theories

That the sovereign will of God is the foundation of Moral Obligation -- The theory of Paley -- The utilitarian philosophy

LECTURE 6

Foundation of Moral Obligation--False Theories

The theory that regards right as the foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE 7

Foundation of Moral Obligation--False Theories

The theory that the goodness or moral excellence of God is the foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE 8

Foundation of Moral Obligation--False Theories

The Philosophy which teaches that moral order is the foundation of moral obligation -- The theory that maintains that the nature and relations of moral beings is the true foundation of moral obligation -- The theory that teaches that moral obligation is founded in the idea of duty -- That philosophy which teaches the complexity of the foundation of moral obligation -- Another form of the theory that affirms the complexity of the foundation of moral obligation; complex, however, only in a certain sense

LECTURE 9

Foundation of Moral Obligation--Practical Bearings of the Different Theories

The theory that regards the sovereign will of God as the foundation of moral obligation -- The theory of the selfish school -- The natural and necessary results of utilitarianism

LECTURE 10

Foundation of Moral Obligation--Practical Bearings of the Different Theories--Continued

Practical bearings and tendency of Rightarianism -- The philosophy which teaches that the divine goodness or moral excellence is the foundation of moral obligation -- The theory which teaches that moral order is the foundation of moral obligation -- The practical bearings of the theory that moral obligation is founded in the nature and relations of moral agents -- The theory which teaches that the idea of duty is the foundation of moral obligation -- The complexity of the foundation of moral obligation -- The practical bearings of what is regarded as the true theory of the foundation of moral obligation, namely that the highest well-being of God and of the universe is the sole foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE 11

Moral Government--Continued

What constitutes obedience to moral law -- Obedience cannot be partial in the sense that the subject ever does or can partly obey and partly disobey at the same time -- Can the will at the same time make opposite choices? -- The choice of an ultimate end is, and must be, the supreme preference of the mind -- An intelligent choice must respect ends or means -- No choice whatever can be made inconsistent with the present choice of an ultimate end -- Inquiry respecting the strength or intensity of the choice -- The law does not require the constant and most intense action of the will -- An intention cannot be right and honest in kind and deficient in the degree of intensity -- Examination of the philosophy of the question whether sin and holiness consist in supreme ultimate and opposite choices or intentions -- Objections to the foregoing philosophy considered -- This philosophy examined in the light of the Scriptures

LECTURE 12

Moral Government--Continued

In what sense we have seen that obedience to moral law cannot be partial -- In what sense obedience to moral law can be partial -- The government of God accepts nothing as virtue but obedience to the law of God -- There can be no rule of duty but moral law -- Nothing can be virtue or true religion but obedience to the moral law -- Nothing can be virtue that is not just what the moral law demands. That is, nothing short of what it requires can be in any sense virtue -- Uses of the term Justification -- Fundamentally important inquiries respecting this subject -- Remarks

LECTURE 13

Moral Government--Continued

What constitutes obedience to moral law--Just rules of legal interpretation--That actual knowledge is indispensable to moral obligation shown from scripture--In the light of the above rules inquire what is not implied in entire obedience to the law of God

LECTURE 14

Moral Government--Continued

Call attention to certain facts in mental philosophy as they are revealed in consciousness--Point out the attributes of that love which constitutes obedience to the law of God--Voluntariness--Liberty--Intelligence--Virtuousness--Disinterestedness--Impartiality--Universality

LECTURE 15

Attributes of Love

Efficiency--Penitence--Faith--Complacency 

LECTURE 16

Attributes of Love--Continued

Opposition--Compassion

LECTURE 17

Attributes of Love--Continued

Mercy--Justice--Truth or truthfulness 

LECTURE 18

Attributes of Love--Continued

Patience -- Meekness -- Long-suffering -- Humility 

LECTURE 19

Attributes of Love--Continued

Self-Denial--Condescension--Candor--Stability--Kindness--Severity 

LECTURE 20

Attributes of Love--Continued

Holiness, or Purity --Modesty --Sobriety --Sincerity --Zeal --Unity --Simplicity 

LECTURE 21

Attributes of Love--Continued

Gratitude --Wisdom --Economy 

LECTURE 22

Moral Government

Revert to some points that have been settled --Show what disobedience to moral law cannot consist in --What disobedience to moral law must consist in 

LECTURE 23

Moral Government

What constitutes disobedience --What is not implied in disobedience to the law of God 

LECTURE 24

Attributes of Selfishness

What constitutes disobedience to moral law --What is implied in disobedience to moral law

Attributes of selfishness - Voluntariness --Liberty --Intelligence --Unreasonableness --Interestedness --Partiality --Impenitence --Unbelief 

LECTURE 25

Attributes of Selfishness--Continued

Efficiency --Opposition to benevolence or to virtue --Cruelty --Unreasonableness --Injustice 

LECTURE 26

Attributes of Selfishness-Continued

Oppression --War --Unmercifulness --Falsehood or lying--Pride 

LECTURE 27

Attributes of Selfishness--Continued

Enmity--Madness--Impatience--Intemperance--Recklessness--Unity 

LECTURE 28

Attributes of Selfishness--Continued

Egotism--Simplicity--Total Moral Depravity implied in selfishness as one of its attributes--The scriptures assume and affirm it--Remarks 

LECTURE 29

Moral Government

Obedience to Moral Law is and must be, under every dispensation of the Divine Government the unalterable condition of Salvation--Under a gracious dispensation, a return to full obedience to Moral Law is not dispensed with as a condition of Salvation, but this obedience is secured by the indwelling spirit of Christ received by faith to reign in the heart 

LECTURE 30

Moral Government

What constitutes the sanctions of law--There can be no law without sanctions--In what light sanctions are to be regarded--The end to be secured by law, and the execution of penal sanctions--By what rule sanctions ought to be graduated--God's law has sanctions --What constitutes the remuneratory sanctions of the law of God--The perfection and duration of the remuneratory sanctions of the law of God--What constitutes the vindicatory sanctions of the law of God--Duration of the penal sanctions of the law of God--Inquire into the meaning of the term Infinite--Infinities may differ indefinitely in amount--I must remind you of the rule by which degrees of guilt are to be estimated--That all and every sin must from its very nature involve infinite guilt in the sense of deserving endless punishment--Notwithstanding all sin deserves endless punishment, yet the guilt of different persons may vary indefinitely, and punishment, although always endless in duration, may and ought to vary in degree according to the guilt of each individual--That penal inflictions under the government of God must be endless--Examine this question in the light of Revelation 

LECTURE 31

Atonement

I will call attention to several well established governmental principles--Define the term Atonement--I am to inquire into the teachings of natural theology, or into the a priori affirmations of reason upon this subject--The fact of Atonement--The design of the Atonement--Christ's obedience to the moral law as a covenant of works, did not constitute the Atonement--The atonement was not a commercial transaction--The atonement of Christ was intended as a satisfaction of public justice--His taking human nature, and obeying unto death, under such circumstances, constituted a good reason for our being treated as righteous 

LECTURE 32

Extent of Atonement

For whose benefit the Atonement was intended--Objections answered --Remarks on the Atonement

LECTURE 33

Human Government

The ultimate end of God in creation--Providential and Moral Governments are indispensable means of securing the highest good of the universe--Civil and family governments are indispensable to the securing of this end, and are therefore really a part of the Providential and moral government of God--Human Governments are a necessity of human nature--This necessity will continue as long as human beings exist in this world--Human Governments are plainly recognized in the Bible as a part of the moral government of God--It is the duty of all men to aid in the establishment and support of Human Government--It is absurd to suppose that human governments can ever be dispensed with in the present world--Objections answered--Inquire into the foundation of the right of human governments--Point out the limits or boundary of this right 

LECTURE 34

Human Governments--Continued

The reasons why God has made no form of Church or Civil Government universally obligatory--The particular forms of Church and State Government, must and will depend upon virtue and intelligence of the people--That form of Government is obligatory, that is best suited to meet the necessities of the people--Revolutions become necessary and obligatory, when the virtue and intelligence or the vice and ignorance of the people demand them--In what cases human legislation is valid, and in what cases it is null and void--In what cases we are bound to disobey human governments--Apply the foregoing principles to the rights and duties of governments and subjects in relation to the execution of the necessary penalties of law 

LECTURE 35

Moral Depravity

Definition of the term Depravity--Point out the distinction between physical and moral depravity--Of what physical depravity can be predicated--Of what moral depravity can be predicated--Mankind are both physically and morally depraved--Subsequent to the commencement of moral agency and previous to regeneration the moral depravity of mankind is universal--The moral depravity of the unregenerate moral agents of our race, is total

LECTURE 36

Moral Depravity--Continued

Proper method of accounting for the universal and total moral depravity of the unregenerate moral agents of our race--Moral depravity consists in selfishness, or in the choice of self-interest, self-gratification, or self-indulgence, as an end--Dr. Wood's view of Physical and Moral Depravity examined--Standards of the Presbyterian Church examined 

LECTURE 37 

Moral Depravity--Continued

Further examination of the arguments adduced in support of the position that human nature is in itself sinful 

LECTURE 38

Moral Depravity--Continued

The Proper Method of Accounting for Moral Depravity--Prest. Edwards views examined--Summary of the Truth on this subject--Remarks 

LECTURE 39

Regeneration

The common distinction between Regeneration and Conversion--I am to state the assigned reasons for this distinction--I am to state the objections to this distinctions--What regeneration is not--What regeneration is--The universal necessity of regeneration--Agencies employed in regeneration--Instrumentalities employed in the work--In regeneration the subject is both passive and active--What is implied in regeneration 

LECTURE 40

Regeneration--Continued

Philosophical theories of regeneration--The different theories of Regeneration examined--Objections to the Taste Scheme--The Susceptibility Scheme--Theory of a Divine Moral Suasion--Objections to this theory--Remarks 

LECTURE 41

Regeneration--Continued

Evidences of Regeneration--Introductory Remarks--Wherein the experience and outward life of saints and sinners may agree--Remarks 

LECTURE 42

Regeneration--Continued

Wherein Saints and Sinners or Deceived Professors must differ 

LECTURE 43

Regeneration--Continued

In what Saints and Sinners differ--What is it to overcome the world--Who are those that overcome the world--Why do believers overcome the world 

LECTURE 44

Regeneration--Continued--Wherein Saints and Sinners differ

Systematic Theology, Volume 3 --1847

TITLE PAGE

PREFACE 

LECTURE XLV.

VARIOUS CLASSES OF TRUTHS

Enumerated and elucidated 

LECTURE XLVI.

NATURAL ABILITY.

Show what is the Edwardean notion of ability This natural ability is no ability at all What, according to this school, constitutes natural inability This natural inability is no inability at all Natural ability is identical with freedom or liberty of will--The human will is free, therefore men have ability to do all their duty 

LECTURE XLVII.

MORAL ABILITY.

What constitutes moral inability according to the Edward school--Their moral inability consists in real disobedience and a natural inability to obey--This pretended distinction between natural and moral inability is non-sensical--What constitutes moral ability according to this school--Their moral ability to obey God is nothing else than real obedience, and a natural inability to disobey 

LECTURE XLVIII.

INABILITY.

What is thought to be the fundamental error of the Edwardean school on the subject of ability--State the philosophy of the scheme of inability about to be considered--The claims of this philosophy 

LECTURE XLIX.

GRACIOUS ABILITY.

What is intended by the term--This doctrine as held an absurdity--In what sense a gracious ability is possible 

LECTURE L.

THE NOTION OF INABILITY.

Proper mode of accounting for it 

LECTURE LI.

REPENTANCE AND IMPENITENCE.

What repentance is not and what it is--What is implied in it--What impenitence is not--What it is--Some things that are implied in it--Some evidences of it 

LECTURE LII.

FAITH AND UNBELIEF.

What evangelical faith is not--What it is--What is implied in it--What unbelief is not--What it is,--What is implied in it--Conditions of both faith and unbelief--The guilt and desert of unbelief--Natural and governmental consequences of both faith and unbelief 

LECTURE LIII.

JUSTIFICATION.

What justification is not--What it is--Conditions of gospel justification 

LECTURE LIV.

SANCTIFICATION.

An account of the recent discussions that have been had on this subject 

LECTURE LV.

SANCTIFICATION.

Remind you of some points that have been settled in this course of study--Definition of the principal terms to be used in this discussion 

LECTURE LVI.

SANCTIFICATION.

Entire sanctification is attainable in this life 

LECTURE LVII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Bible Argument 

LECTURE LVIII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Paul entirely sanctified 

LECTURE LIX.

SANCTIFICATION.

Condition of its attainment 

LECTURE LX.

SANCTIFICATION.

Condition of its attainment--continued

Relations of Christ to the believer 

LECTURE LXI.

SANCTIFICATION.

Relations of Christ to the believer--continued 

LECTURE LXII.

SANCTIFICATION,

Relations of Christ to the believer--conti 

LECTURE LXIII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Relations of Christ to the believer--continued 

LECTURE LXIV.

SANCTIFICATION.

Relations of Christ to the believer--continued 

LECTURE LXV.

SANCTIFICATION.

Objections answered 

LECTURE LXVI.

SANCTIFICATION.

Tendency of the denial that Christians have valid grounds of hope that they shall obtain a victory over sin in this life 

LECTURE LXVII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Objections---continued 

LECTURE LXVIII.

SANCTIFICATION.

Objections--continued 

LECTURE LXIX.

SANCTIFICATION.

Objections--continued 

LECTURE LXX

SANCTIFICATION.

Remarks 

LECTURE LXXI.

ELECTION.

Reference to points that have been settled--What the Bible doctrine of election is not--What the Bible doctrine of election is--Prove the doctrine as stated to be true--What could not have been the reason for election--What must have been the reason for election--When the election was made--Election does not render means for the salvation of the elect unnecessary--Election lays a foundation for hope in the use of means--Election does not oppose any obstacle to the salvation of the non-elect--There is no injustice in election--This is the best that could be done for the inhabitants of this world--How we may ascertain our own election--Inferences and remarks 

LECTURE LXXII

REPROBATION.

What the true doctrine of reprobation is not--What the true doctrine of reprobation is--This is a doctrine of reason.--This is a doctrine of revelation--Why sinners are reprobated or rejected--When sinners are reprobated--Reprobation just--Reprobation is benevolent--Reprobation is the best thing that can be done, ail things considered--How it may be known who are reprobated--Objections--Remarks 

LECTURE LXXIII.

DIVINE SOVEREIGNTY.

What is not intended by the term sovereignty when applied to God--What is intended by Divine Sovereignty--God is and ought to be a universal and absolute sovereign--Remarks 

LECTURE LXXIV.

PURPOSES OF GOD.

What the writer understands by the purposes of God--Distinction between purpose and decree--There must be some sense in which God's purposes extend to all events--Different senses in which God purposes different events--God's revealed will never inconsistent with his secret purpose--Wisdom and benevolence of the purposes of God--The immutability of the divine purposes--The purposes of God a ground of eternal and joyful confidence.--The relation of God's purposes to his prescience--God's purposes not inconsistent with, but demand the use of means both on his part and on ours, to accomplish them 

LECTURE LXXV.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Notice the different kinds of certainty--What is not intended by the perseverance of the saints. 

LECTURE LXXVI.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Objections answered 

LECTURE LXXVII.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Further objections considered. 

LECTURE LXXVIII.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Consideration of the principal arguments in support of the doctrine 

LECTURE LXXIX.

PERSEVERANCE OF SAINTS.

Perseverance proved

Oberlin Quarterly Review --1846-1848

ARTICLE XX.MORAL DEPRAVITY [Part 1] BY REV. C. G. FINNEY,

ARTICLE XXIV.MORAL DEPRAVITY [Part 2] BY REV. C. G. FINNEY,

MEDICAL REVIEW BY PROF. C. G. FINNEY

ARTICLE XLVIII. RECENT DISCUSSIONS ON ENTIRE SANCTIFICATION IN THIS LIFE BY PROF. C. G. FINNEY.

ARTICLE LII. AN EXAMINATION, BY REV. C. G. FINNEY, Of the Review of Finney's Systematic Theology published in the Biblical Repertory, Princeton, N.J., June, 1847.

ARTICLE LXVIII.A REPLY BY PROF. C. G. FINNEY. to the "WARNING AGAINST ERROR," which was written by the Rev. Dr. Duffield, and approved and adopted, first by the Presbytery of Detroit, and subsequently by the Synod of Michigan

 

Guide to the Savior--1848

 

Two Sermons --1849

The New Birth.

Enoch's Testimony.

The Penny Pulpit --1849-51

Regeneration

Pleasing God

Heart Searching

Acceptable Prayer

The Kingdom Of God Upon Earth

The Reward of Fervent Prayer

The Promises Of God

Christ The Mediator

Christ Magnifying The Law

The Spiritual Claims Of London

The Conditions of Prevailing Prayer

How To Prevail With God

The Use And Prevalence Of Christ's Name

Making God A Liar

The Great Business of Life

Mocking God

Why London Is Not Converted

Holiness Essential To Salvation

Real Religion

Great Cities--What Hinders Their Conversion

Proving God

Total Abstinence A Christian Duty

Quenching The Spirit

The Sabbath School--Cooperation With God

The Sabbath School--Conditions Of Success

Not Far From The Kingdom Of God

The Christian's Rule Of Life

Hardening The Heart

Seeking Honour From Men

Purity Of Heart And Life

The Sinner's Self Condemnation

Refuges Of Lies

The Spirit Ceasing To Strive

The Conversion Of Children

The Wonderful Love Of God

The Infinite Worth Of The Soul

Family Government

Christ Appearing Among His People

The Awful Ingratitude Of The Sinner

Little Sins

The Sinner's Self-Destruction

The Rationality Of Faith

The Certain Doom Of The Impenitent

A Public Profession Of Christ

The Whole Counsel Of God

 

Repentance: ITS NATURE, GROUNDS, NECESSITY, AND INFINITE IMPORTANCE. 1851

 

1851 Systematic Theology

PREFACE by the AUTHOR

PREFACE by the EDITOR

LECTURE I. Various classes of truths, and how the mind attains to a knowledge of them

LECTURE II. -- Moral Government. Definition of the term law . . Distinction between physical and moral law . . The essential attributes of moral law . . Subjectivity . . Objectivity . . Liberty, as opposed to necessity . . Fitness . . Universality . . Impartiality . . Justice . . Practicability . . Independence . . Immutability . . Unity . . Equity . . Expediency . . Exclusiveness

LECTURE III. -- Moral Government--Continued. Definition of the term government . . Distinction between moral and physical government . . The fundamental reason of moral government . . Whose right it is to govern . . What is implied in the right to govern . . Point out the limits of this right . . What is implied in moral government . . Moral obligation . . The conditions of moral obligation . . Remarks

LECTURE IV. -- Moral Government--Continued. Man a subject of moral obligation . . Extent of moral obligation . . Shown by an appeal to reason, or to natural theology, to what acts and states of mind moral obligation cannot directly extend . . Shown to what acts and states of mind moral obligation must directly extend . . To what acts and mental states moral obligation indirectly extends

LECTURE V. -- Foundation of Moral Obligation. What is intended by the foundation of moral obligation . . The extent of moral obligation . . Remind you of the distinction between the ground and conditions of obligation . . Points of agreement among the principal parties in this discussion . . Wherein they disagree . . That the sovereign will of God is not the foundation of moral obligation . . The theory of Paley . . The utilitarian philosophy

LECTURE VI. -- Foundation of Moral Obligation. False Theories. The theory that regards right as the foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE VII. -- Foundation of Moral Obligation. False Theories. The theory that the goodness or moral excellence of God is the foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE VIII. -- Foundation of Moral Obligation. False Theories. The philosophy which teaches that moral order is the foundation of moral obligation . . The theory that maintains that the nature and relations of moral beings is the true foundation of moral obligation . . The theory that teaches that moral obligation is founded in the idea of duty . . That philosophy which teaches the complexity of the foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE IX. -- Foundation of Obligation. Another form of the theory that affirms the complexity of the foundation of moral obligation; complex however only in a certain sense

LECTURE X. -- Foundation of Obligation. The intrinsic absurdity of various theories

LECTURE XI. Summing up

LECTURE XII. -- Foundation of Moral Obligation. Practical Bearings of the Different Theories. The theory that regards the sovereign will of God as the foundation of moral obligation . . The theory of the selfish school . . The natural and necessary results of utilitarianism

LECTURE XIII. -- Practical Bearings and Tendency of Rightarianism. The philosophy which teaches that the divine goodness or moral excellence is the foundation of moral obligation . . The theory which teaches that moral order is the foundation of moral obligation . . The practical bearings of the theory that moral obligation is founded in the nature and relations of moral agents . . The theory which teaches that the idea of duty is the foundation of moral obligation . . The complexity of the foundation of moral obligation . . The practical bearings of what is regarded as the true theory of the foundation of moral obligation, viz. that the highest well-being of God and of the universe is the sole foundation of moral obligation

LECTURE XIV. -- Moral Government--Continued. What constitutes obedience to moral law . . Obedience cannot be partial in the sense that the subject ever does or can partly obey and partly disobey at the same time . . Can the will at the same time make opposite choices? . . The choice of an ultimate end is, and must be, the supreme preference of the mind . . An intelligent choice must respect ends or means . . No choice whatever can be made inconsistent with the present choice of an ultimate end . . Inquiry respecting the strength or intensity of the choice . . The law does not require the constant and most intense action of the will . . An intention cannot be right and honest in kind, and deficient in the degree of intensity . . Examination of the philosophy of the question, whether sin and holiness consist in supreme, ultimate, and opposite choices or intentions . . Objections to the foregoing philosophy considered . . This philosophy examined in the light of the scriptures

LECTURE XV. -- Moral Government--Continued. In what sense we have seen that obedience to moral law cannot be partial . . In what sense obedience to moral law can be partial . . The government of God accepts nothing as virtue but obedience to the law of God . . There can be no rule of duty but moral law . . Nothing can be virtue or true religion but obedience to the moral law . . Nothing can be virtue that is not just what the moral law demands. That is, nothing short of what it requires can be in any sense virtue . . Uses of the term justification . . Fundamentally important inquiries respecting this subject . . Remarks

LECTURE XVI. -- Moral Government--Continued. What constitutes obedience to moral law . . Just rules of legal interpretation . . That actual knowledge is indispensable to moral obligation shown from scripture . . In the light of the above rules, inquire what is not implied in entire obedience to the law of God

LECTURE XVII. -- Moral Government--Continued. What is implied in obedience to the moral law . . Call attention to certain facts in mental philosophy, as they are revealed in consciousness . . Point out the attributes of that love which constitutes obedience to the law of God . . Voluntariness . . Liberty . . Intelligence . . Virtuousness . . Disinterestedness . . Impartiality . . Universality

LECTURE XVIII. -- Attributes of Love. Efficiency . . Penitence . . Faith . . Complacency

LECTURE XIX. -- Attributes of Love--Continued. Opposition to Sin . . Compassion

LECTURE XX. -- Attributes of Love--Continued. Mercy . . Justice . . Veracity

LECTURE XXI. -- Attributes of Love--Continued. Patience . . Meekness . . Long-suffering . . Humility

LECTURE XXII. -- Attributes of Love--Continued. Self-denial . . Condescension . . Candour . . Stability . . Kindness . . Severity

LECTURE XXIII. -- Attributes of Love--Continued. Holiness, or Purity . . Modesty . . Sobriety . . Sincerity . . Zeal . . Unity . . Simplicity

LECTURE XXIV. -- Attributes of Love--Continued. Gratitude . . Wisdom . . Grace . . Economy

LECTURE XXV. -- Moral Government. Revert to some points that have been settled . . Show what disobedience to moral law cannot consist in . . What disobedience to moral law must consist in

LECTURE XXVI. -- Moral Government. What constitutes disobedience . . What is not implied in disobedience to the law of God

LECTURE XXVII. -- Attributes of Selfishness. What constitutes disobedience to moral law . . What is implied in disobedience to moral law . . Attributes of Selfishness. Voluntariness . . Liberty . . Intelligence . . Unreasonableness . . Interestedness . . Partiality . . Impenitence . . Unbelief

LECTURE XXVIII. -- Attributes of Selfishness--Continued. Efficiency . . Opposition to benevolence or to virtue . . Cruelty . . Injustice

LECTURE XXIX. -- Attributes of Selfishness--Continued. Oppression . . Hostility . . Unmercifulness . . Falsehood, or lying . . Pride

LECTURE XXX. -- Attributes of Selfishness--Continued. Enmity . . Madness . . Impatience . . Intemperance . . Moral recklessness . . Unity

LECTURE XXXI. -- Attributes of Selfishness--Continued.

Egotism . . Simplicity . . Total moral depravity implied in selfishness as one of its attributes . . The scriptures assume and affirm it . . Remarks

LECTURE XXXII. -- Moral Government--Continued. A return to obedience to moral law is and must be, under every dispensation of the divine government, the unalterable condition of salvation . . Under a gracious dispensation, a return to full obedience to moral law is not dispensed with as a condition of salvation, but this obedience is secured by the indwelling spirit of Christ received by faith to reign in the heart

LECTURE XXXIII. -- Moral Government--Continued. What constitutes the sanctions of law . . There can be no law without sanctions . . In what light sanctions are to be regarded . . The end to be secured by law, and the execution of penal sanctions . . By what rule sanctions ought to be graduated . . God's law has sanctions . . What constitutes the remuneratory sanctions of the law of God . . The perfection and duration of the remuneratory sanctions of the law of God . . What constitutes the vindicatory sanctions of the law of God . . Duration of the penal sanctions of the law of God . . Inquire into the meaning of the term infinite . . Infinites may differ indefinitely in amount . . I must remind you of the rule by which degrees of guilt are to be estimated . . That all and every sin must from its very nature involve infinite guilt in the sense of deserving endless punishment . . Notwithstanding all sin deserves endless punishment, yet the guilt of different persons may vary indefinitely, and punishment, although always endless in duration, may and ought to vary in degree, according to the guilt of each individual . . That penal inflictions under the government of God must be endless . . Examine this question in the light of revelation

LECTURE XXXIV. -- Atonement. I will call attention to several well established governmental principles . . Define the term atonement . . I am to inquire into the teachings of natural theology, or into the à priori affirmations of reason upon this subject . . The fact of atonement . . The design of the atonement . . Christ's obedience to the moral law as a covenant of works, did not constitute the atonement . . The atonement was not a commercial transaction . . The atonement of Christ was intended as a satisfaction of public justice . . His taking human nature, and obeying unto death, under such circumstances, constituted a good reason for our being treated as righteous

LECTURE XXXV. -- Extent of Atonement. For whose benefit the atonement was intended . . Objections answered . . Remarks on the atonement

LECTURE XXXVI. -- Human Government. The ultimate end of God in creation . . Providential and moral governments are indispensable means of securing the highest good of the universe . . Civil and family governments are indispensable to the securing of this end, and are therefore really a part of the providential and moral government of God . . Human governments are a necessity of human nature . . This necessity will continue as long as human beings exist in this world . . Human governments are plainly recognized in the Bible as a part of the moral government of God . . It is the duty of all men to aid in the establishment and support of human government . . It is absurd to suppose that human governments can ever be dispensed with in the present world . . Objections answered . . Inquire into the foundation of the right of human governments . . Point out the limits or boundary of this right

LECTURE XXXVII. -- Human Governments--Continued. The reasons why God has made no form of civil government universally obligatory . . The particular forms of state government must and will depend upon the virtue and intelligence of the people . . That form of government is obligatory, that is best suited to meet the necessities of the people . . Revolutions become necessary and obligatory, when the virtue and intelligence or the vice and ignorance of the people demand them . . In what cases human legislation is valid, and in what cases it is null and void . . In what cases we are bound to disobey human governments . . Apply the foregoing principles to the rights and duties of governments and subjects in relation to the execution of the necessary penalties of law

LECTURE XXXVIII. -- Moral Depravity. Definition of the term depravity . . Point out the distinction between physical and moral depravity . . Of what physical depravity can be predicated . . Of what moral depravity can be predicated . . Mankind are both physically and morally depraved . . Subsequent to the commencement of moral agency and previous to regeneration the moral depravity of mankind is universal . . The moral depravity of the unregenerate moral agents of our race, is total

LECTURE XXXIX. -- Moral Depravity--Continued. Proper method of accounting for the universal and total moral depravity of the unregenerate moral agents of our race . . Moral depravity consists in selfishness, or in the choice of self-interest, self-gratification, or self-indulgence, as an end . . Dr. Wood's view of physical and moral depravity examined . . Standards of the Presbyterian Church examined

LECTURE XL. -- Moral Depravity--Continued. Further examination of the arguments adduced in support of the position that human nature is in itself sinful

LECTURE XLI. -- Moral Depravity--Continued. The proper method of accounting for moral depravity . . Pres. Edwards's views examined . . Summary of the truth on this subject . . Remarks

LECTURE XLII. -- Regeneration. The common distinction between regeneration and conversion . . I am to state the assigned reasons for this distinction . . I am to state the objections to this distinction . . What regeneration is not . . What regeneration is . . The universal necessity of regeneration . . Agencies employed in regeneration . . Instrumentalities employed in the work . . In regeneration the subject is both passive and active . . What is implied in regeneration

LECTURE XLIII. -- Regeneration--Continued. Philosophical theories of regeneration . . The different theories of regeneration examined . . Objections to the taste scheme . . The divine efficiency scheme . . Objections to the divine efficiency . . The susceptibility scheme . . Theory of a divine moral suasion . . Objections to this theory . . Remarks

LECTURE XLIV. -- Regeneration--Continued. Evidences of regeneration . . Introductory remarks . . Wherein the experience and outward life of saints and sinners may agree . . Remarks

LECTURE XLV. -- Regeneration--Continued. Wherein saints and sinners or deceived professors must differ

LECTURE XLVI. -- Regeneration--Continued. In what saints and sinners differ . . What is it to overcome the world? . . Who are those that overcome the world? . . Why do believers overcome the world?

LECTURE XLVII. -- Regeneration--Continued. Wherein saints and sinners differ

LECTURE XLVIII. -- Natural Ability. Show what is the Edwardean notion of ability . . This natural ability is no ability at all . . What, according to this school, constitutes natural inability . . This natural inability is no inability at all . . Natural ability is identical with freedom or liberty of will . . The human will is free, therefore men have ability to do all their duty

LECTURE XLIX. -- Moral Ability. What constitutes moral inability according to the Edwardean school . . Their moral inability consists in real disobedience, and a natural inability to obey . . This pretended distinction between natural and moral inability is nonsensical . . What constitutes moral ability according to this school . . Their moral ability to obey God is nothing else than real obedience, and a natural inability to disobey

LECTURE L. -- Inability. What is thought to be the fundamental error of the Edwardean school on the subject of ability . . State the philosophy of the scheme of inability about to be considered . . The claims of this philosophy

LECTURE LI. -- Gracious Ability. What is intended by the term . . This doctrine as held is an absurdity . . In what sense a gracious ability is possible

LECTURE LII. -- The Notion of Inability. Proper mode of accounting for it

LECTURE LIII. [There is no Lecture LIII in the printed book. The lectures are incorrectly numbered.)

LECTURE LIV. -- Repentance and Impenitence. What repentance is not, and what it is . . What is implied in it . . What impenitence is not . . What it is . . Some things that are implied in it . . Some evidences of it

LECTURE LV. -- Faith and Unbelief. What evangelical faith is not . . What it is . . What is implied in it . . What unbelief is not . . What it is,--What is implied in it . . Conditions of both faith and unbelief . . The guilt and desert of unbelief . . Natural and governmental consequences of both faith and unbelief

LECTURE LVI. -- Justification. What justification is not . . What it is . . Conditions of gospel justification

LECTURE LVII. -- Sanctification. An account of the recent discussions that have been had on this subject

LECTURE LVIII. -- Sanctification. Remind you of some points that have been settled in this course of study . . Definition of the principal terms to be used in this discussion

LECTURE LIX. -- Sanctification. Entire sanctification is attainable in this life

LECTURE LX. -- Sanctification. Bible argument

LECTURE LXI. -- Sanctification. Paul entirely sanctified

LECTURE LXII. -- Sanctification. Condition of its attainment

LECTURE LXIII. -- Sanctification. Condition of its attainment--continued . . Relations of Christ to the believer

LECTURE LXIV. -- Sanctification. Relations of Christ to the believer--continued

LECTURE LXV. -- Sanctification. Relations of Christ to the believer--continued

LECTURE LXVI. -- Sanctification. Relations of Christ to the believer--continued

LECTURE LXVII. -- Sanctification. Relations of Christ to the believer--continued

LECTURE LXVIII. -- Sanctification. Objections answered

LECTURE LXIX. -- Sanctification. Tendency of the denial that Christians have valid grounds of hope that they should obtain a victory over sin in this life

LECTURE LXX. -- Sanctification. Objections--continued

LECTURE LXXI. -- Sanctification. Objections--continued

LECTURE LXXII. -- Sanctification. Objections--continued

LECTURE LXXIII. -- Sanctification. Remarks

LECTURE LXXIV. Election

LECTURE LXXV. Reprobation

LECTURE LXXVI. Divine Sovereignty

LECTURE LXXVII. Purposes of God

LECTURE LXXVIII. -- Perseverance of Saints. Notice the different kinds of certainty . . What is not intended by the perseverance of the saints

LECTURE LXXIX. Perseverance of Saints proved

LECTURE LXXX. -- Perseverance of Saints. Further objections considered

LECTURE LXXXI. -- Perseverance of Saints. Consideration of principal arguments in support of the doctrine

LECTURE LXXXII. -- Perseverance of Saints. Perseverance proved

LECTURE LXXXIII. -- Perseverance of Saints. Further objections answered

APPENDIX A A Reply To "Princeton Biblical Repertory"

APPENDIX B Reply to Dr. Duffield

 

Questions on Moral Philosophy

The Prevailing Prayer-Meeting: 1859 in Scotland

The Freeness Of The Gospel1860

Lectures on Theology, Vol. 1 (Previously Unpublished)

LECTURE I, II. ---- INTRODUCTORY. Define the study upon which we are about to enter ---- Some of the requisite personal qualifications for this study ---- Some of the advantages to be derived from the study of Systematic Theology ---- Some things to be avoided ---- Remarks.

LECTURE III. ---- INTRODUCTORY ---- CONSCIOUSNESS AND SENSE. Do we know anything? ---- How do we know ourselves? ---- What do we know of ourselves in consciousness? ---- What is meant by sense?

LECTURE IV. ---- INTRODUCTORY ---- REASON. What we mean by the reason, as distinct from the other functions of the intellect ---- First truths of reason have the following characteristics ---- Examples of some first truths of reason ---- How these truths are developed in the reason ---- Division of first truths of reason ---- Second class of truths of reason -- How this class of truths (second class) is developed in the reason -- Remarks -- Truths of conscience -- How the ideas of conscience are developed.

LECTURE V. -- INTRODUCTORY -- THE UNDERSTANDING, JUDGMENT, AND FREEDOM OF THE WILL. The understanding -- The judgment -- The will.

LECTURE VI. -- INTRODUCTORY -- IMMORTALITY OF THE SOUL. Argument from consciousness -- Moral argument -- The Bible argument -- Objections.

LECTURE VI--b. -- INTRODUCTORY -- EVIDENCE. The importance of a correct and thorough knowledge of the laws of evidence -- What is evidence and what is proof, and the difference between them -- Source of evidence in a course of theological inquiry -- Kinds and degrees of evidence to be expected -- When objections are not, and when they are fatal -- How objections are to be disposed of -- Where lies the burden of proof -- Where proof or argument must begin.

LECTURE VII. -- THE EXISTENCE OF GOD. Several ways in which God may reveal himself to rational beings -- Two revelations -- What God is as known to us in the irresistible convictions of our minds -- Principle terms to be used in discussion of God's existence -- Some self-evident truths of reason -- Argument for the existence of God -- Argument for the existence of God as Moral Governor.

LECTURE VIII. -- THE EXISTENCE OF GOD (CONTINUED). Argument from final causes; or, from apparent ultimate design -- Facts and self-evident truths -- The following positions are manifest -- Propositions -- Stating the substance of the above propositions in another form -- Argument from consciousness of the existence of God -- First objection -- Second objection -- Method of the natural reason -- Summary remarks.

LECTURE IX. -- THE NATURAL ATTRIBUTES OF GOD. What is a natural attribute? -- What are the natural attributes of God? -- Self-existence -- Immutability -- Absoluteness -- Infinity -- Liberty -- Omniscience -- Omnipotence -- Eternity -- Ubiquity or omnipresence -- Spirituality -- Moral agency -- Unity -- Independence -- Natural perfection.

LECTURE X. -- THE MORAL ATTRIBUTES OF GOD. What is moral character, and what are moral attributes? -- God is morally and infinitely good -- Two objections that have been made to the benevolence of God -- What are the moral attributes of God? -- Justice -- Mercy.

LECTURE XI. -- THE MORAL ATTRIBUTES OF GOD (CONTINUED). Veracity -- Disinterestedness -- Forbearance -- Long--suffering -- Self-denial -- Impartiality -- Beneficence -- Sovereignty.

LECTURE XII. -- THE MORAL ATTRIBUTES OF GOD (CONTINUED). Firmness -- Severity -- Efficiency -- Simplicity -- Immutability -- Infinity -- Holiness -- Remarks.

The Character, Claims and Practical Workings of Freemasonry.--1868

Author's Preface

Contents.

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: Scrap of History

Chapter 3: How Known

Chapter 4: Credibility of the Books Revealing Freemasonry

Chapter 5: Examination of the Books Revealing Freemasonry

Chapter 6: Masters Degree

Chapter 7: Royal Arch Degree

Chapter 8: Sworn to Persecute

Chapter 9: Awful Profanity of Masonic Oaths

Chapter 10: Perverse and Profane Use of The Holy Bible

Chapter 11: Freemasonry Imposes on the Ignorant

Chapter 12: Masonry Susceptible of Change Only By Additions

Chapter 13: The Claim of Freemasonry To Great Antiquity Is False

Chapter 14: The Boasted Benevolence Of Masons A Sham

Chapter 15: Freemasonry is a False Religion

Chapter 16: The Argument That Great and Good Men Have Been and Are Freemasons, Examined

Chapter 17: Masonic Oaths Are Unlawful and Void

Chapter 18: Why Freemasons Resort To Threats and Refuse To Discuss Their Principles

Chapter 19: Relations of Masonry to The Church of Christ

Chapter 20: Conclusion

 

Pastoral Theology

I. INTRODUCTORY.

II. RECIPROCAL RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF PASTOR AND FLOCK.

III. LEGITIMATE FIELD OF PASTORAL INFLUENCE.

IV. PASTORAL HABITS OF STUDY.

V. PASTORAL HABITS OF DEVOTION.

VI. PASTORAL HABITS OF BUSINESS.

VII. PAROCHIAL DUTIES (OF OR PERTAINING TO A PARISH).

VIII. PASTORAL MANNERS.

IX. VISITING THE SICK.

X. FUNERALS.

XI. MARRIAGES.

XII. PRUDENCE.

XIII. MARRIAGE OF MINISTERS.

XIV. ATTRIBUTES OF A GOOD WIFE. (ESPECIALLY A MINISTER'S).

XV. PAPISTICAL REASONS FOR PRIESTLY CELIBACY.

XVI. EVILS OF CLERICAL CELIBACY.

XVII. PREMATURE MARRIAGES

XVIII. PREPARATION FOR THE PULPIT.

XIX. PULPIT EXERCISES.

XX. PREACHING.

 

Articles in THE INDEPENDENT 1868-1875

FREEMASONRY--I.

FREEMASONRY--11.

FREEMASONRY--III.

FREEMASONRY--IV.

FREEMASONRY--V.

FREEMASONRY--VI.

FREEMASONRY--VII.

FREEMASONRY--VIII.

FREEMASONRY--IX.

FREEMASONRY--X.

FREEMASONRY--XI.

FREEMASONRY--XII.

PREACHING SO AS TO CONVERT NOBODY

HOW TO WIN SOULS

THE ENDUEMENT OF THE HOLY SPIRIT

POWER FROM ON HIGH--WHAT IS IT?

THE ENDUEMENT OF THE SPIRIT

POWER FROM ON HIGH. Who May Expect the Enduement.

ENDUEMENT OF POWER FROM ON HIGH

IS IT A HARD SAYING?

INNOCENT AMUSEMENTS

IS IT A BONDAGE?

WORLDLY AMUSEMENTS

REVIVAL MEMORIES [First of Two]

THE PROGRESS OF THE GOVERNEUR REVIVAL

A MORE EXCELLENT WAY

REVIVAL MEMORIES [Second of Two]

WHAT DOES IT MEAN?

THE DECAY OF CONSCIENCE

HOW TO OVERCOME SIN

BREAK UP YOUR FALLOW GROUND

WHEN IS THE FALLOW GROUND OF THE SOUL BROKEN UP?

PREVAILING PRAYER

HINDRANCES TO REVIVALS [Part 1]

HINDRANCES TO REVIVALS [Part 2]

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF FAITH

CONSCIOUS EFFECTS OF FAITH.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF RIGHTEOUSNESS

PSYCHOLOGY OF UNRIGHTEOUSNESS

THE TRUE MISSIONARY SPIRIT

Fashion in The Christian Mission Magazine, 1870

Preacher, Save Thyself

Revivals of Religion Outline: 1874

Memoirs of Revivals of Religion: Known as his "Autobiography"

"Revival Fire"

Power From On High

CHAPTER 1 - Power From On High

CHAPTER 2 - What Is It?

CHAPTER 3 - The Enduement Of The Spirit

CHAPTER 4 - Enduement Of Power From On High

CHAPTER 5 - Is It A Hard Saying?

CHAPTER 6 - Prevailing Prayer

CHAPTER 7 - How To Win Souls

CHAPTER 8 - Preacher, Save Thyself

CHAPTER 9 - Innocent Amusements

CHAPTER 10 - How To Overcome Sin

CHAPTER 11 - The Decay Of Conscience

CHAPTER 12 - The Psychology Of Faith

CHAPTER 13 - The Psychology Of Righteousness

 

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